This book is a thought-provoking and delightful read. As Mr. Stevens motors his way through the countryside he reflects on happenings both past and present. His quest for dignity is a prevalent theme as are his ruminations on acquiring the gift of bantering. The past includes momentous and historical happenings as well as encounters with Miss Kenton, the former housekeeper. Those exchanges remind me of Mr. Carson and Mrs. Hughes in the Downton series, but without the happy pairing of the two. . . yet we find ourselves daring to hope for more.

Is the reputation of the butler solely tied to his lordship? Does he have individual liberties and obligations outside of his loyalty to the house he serves? As Stevens reflects on "the remains of his day," we do so as well. Very appropriate book group selection. No wonder it was a Nobel prize winner.

darladoodles's rating:
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